Iwo Jima

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On this day back in 1945, the battle of Iwo Jima was taking place.  During the fighting, a group of U.S. military personnel climb to the top of Mount Suribachi and planted the American flag. This moment lives on due to a well timed photo from Joe Rosenthal.

To learn more about the Battle of Iwo Jima and this iconic moment visit your local library!

     

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Spring Snow

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I’m going to tell you about something you don’t want to know about:  SNOW. As we go into April, it may be Spring by the calendar but it still seems like winter.  And that’s not so unusual!   The latest recorded snowfall in Akron was 0.2 inches on May 6th, 1947.  More recently we saw 1.5 inches on May 4th, 1989, and on April 2st, 1987, the Akron area saw 20.9 inches of snowfall.  So what does this all mean?  It’s time to pick up some cozy mystery books to get you through that last of the winter weather.

Here are some suggestions:

   

    

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Hello Spring!

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 I don’t know about you, but every year right about this time, I get the urge to open the windows to let in fresh air and deep clean the house – check out these handy books filled with tips and tricks to get your home sparkling!

 

              

           

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4 Things You Didn’t Know About St. Patrick and His Holiday

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  • Patrick wasn’t Irish. He was born in England, Scotland or Wales around 390 AD. His father was a deacon and it’s unclear if his family was of Celtic or Italian descent. At age 16, Patrick was captured by Irish raiders and he remained as a slave in Ireland for six years. After fleeing to England and receiving religious training there, he returned to Ireland as a missionary.
  • Patrick did not cast the snakes out of Ireland. Because Ireland is an island nation encircled by water and the climate was too cold during the last Ice Age, it is unlikely Ireland ever had snakes. It is believed that the snake myth is an allegory for pagan beliefs.
  • Green is not St. Patrick’s traditional color. The knights in his order wore a color known as St. Patrick’s blue. Green became the color most associated with Ireland during the movement for Irish independence in the 1700s.
  • Patrick’s Day as we know it was created mostly in America by Irish immigrants who began to celebrate their heritage with parades and events on the saint’s day. There are about 34 million people of Irish descent living in America today.

Sources: history.com and The Huffington Post

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Iditarod

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The Iditarod is the world’s most famous dog sled race. It is an annual race that starts on the first Saturday of March in Anchorage, Alaska and ends in Nome, Alaska. The annual race crosses the Alaska Range and Kuskokwim Mountains range.

Here are some fun facts about the Iditarod:

The Iditarod is known as the “Last Great Race on Earth.”

It is a race over 1150 miles of the roughest, most beautiful terrain Mother Nature has to offer.

It takes place in Alaska with temperatures that reach far below zero, and with winds that can cause a complete loss of visibility. The long hours of darkness and treacherous climbs also make this race very difficult and dangerous.

In 1925, part of the Iditarod Trail became a life saving highway for Nome, Alaska. The city was stricken with diphtheria and serum had to be brought in. Dog mushers and their faithful hard-driving dogs were the ones to get the medicine through to Nome.

The race begins in Wasilla, Alaska. The race route is alternated every other year, one year going north through Cripple, Ruby and Galena, the next year south through Iditarod, Shageluk, Anvik. It ends in Nome where a hero’s welcome is the custom for racers 1 through 61 who finish.

The mushers compete for $69,000 and a new truck.

Each musher can have 16 dogs that they must care for and feed throughout the race.

 

If you are interested in learning more about the Iditarod come check out these books from your library!

Iditarod /by Sue.L. Hamilton.

Akiak : a tale from the Iditarod / Robert J. Blake

Dashing through the snow : the story of the Jr. Iditarod / Sherry Shahan.

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The Raptors of Nimisila

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 The osprey and bald eagle are returning to Nimisila Resevoir and are available for your viewing pleasure!

Look for osprey in treetops or other high places surrounding the lake. Their nests look like a bunch of long sticks woven together haphazardly on top of a pole or broken treetop. I’ve seen them perched on the huge utility towers spanning the 742-acre reservoir. Their wings have a crook at “the elbow”. They dive into the water from great heights, feet first, to catch fish. It is breathtaking to see!

The bald eagle, on the other hand, is a much larger raptor.

 

It is not bald but rather, has a white head that can “disappear” when viewed against the blue sky. Its wings are much larger and wider than the osprey’s and they hold them flat when they fly. Eagles sometimes harass other birds while in flight, in order to get steal their food.

Learn more about these fascinating raptors and how they live at the Green Branch Library.

Some good books to check out are:

       

 

 

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Fly Girls

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Did you know that there was another use for the word wasp?  It was WASP  and stood for Women Air Force Service Pilots.  This was a female unit used during World War 2.   The WASP’s predecessors, the Women’s Flying Training Detachment (WFTD) and the Women’s Auxiliary Ferrying Squadron (WAFS) organized separately in September 1942.  The WFTD and WAFS were merged on August 5, 1943, creating WASP.

 

For further information:

 

Fly Girls

Monday March 9, 2015
6:15 PM
Presented by local historian Ray Hoffman.  Mr. Hoffman will present information about the contributions of the Women Air Force Service Pilots (WASPs) during World War II.

 

Websites:

http://www.npr.org/2010/03/09/123773525/female-wwii-pilots-the-original-fly-girls

 

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/flygirls/index.html

 

http://edsitement.neh.gov/lesson-plan/women-aviators-world-war-ii-fly-girls

 

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/honoring-wwiis-fly-girls/

 

         

 

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How do you combine Read Across America and National Pancake Day?

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Stories about pancakes:

    

    

 

Recipes for pancakes:

    

    

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New magazines at the Green Branch Library

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For  more titles, or if you prefer a digital magazine, check out Zinio through akronlibrary.org.

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American flag at Iwo Jima

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On this day back in 1945, the battle of Iwo Jima was taking place.  During the fighting, a group of U.S. military personnel climb to the top of Mount Suribachi and planted the American flag. This moment lives on due to a well timed photo from Joe Rosenthal.

 

To learn more about the Battle of Iwo Jima and this iconic moment visit your local library!

    

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